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  #11  
Old 15th September 2007, 07:40 PM
Cobblers's Avatar
Cobblers Cobblers is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Malvern
Posts: 1,225
Default Re: WD25Ts completed

Hi DavidG,

Very nice cabinets.
I wish I had the time and skills to make my own cab's like these!


I'm very happy with mine and have just ordered a third WD25a single speaker kit to use as a centre speaker for AV (AV amp drives centre and rears only, hifi amp for front channels) with dinky little Heybrook Heylo floorstanders for rear/side speaker duty.

Welcome to the growing club of happy WD25 owners.
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  #12  
Old 15th September 2007, 10:15 PM
davidg davidg is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Salt Lake City, UT USA
Posts: 9
Default Re: WD25Ts completed

[quote=Sid and Coke;46369]David;
Great job there David. A few questions if you don't mind .

i) Your speakers look great, What sort of 'woodworking' background do you have.

David and All;

ii) What tools would you recommend having to hand in addition to the ones that would be required to build a flat-Pack kit anyway.

I have been a weekend woodworker for about 12 years. I seem to manage one substantial project each year - this year it was the speakers. I would rank my skill level as intermediate, relative to someone who does fine cabinetry for a living.

I have to confess that I have a major weakness for tools. So, for this project, I used:

Table saw (essential)
Router, with a table for some operations (essential)
Planer/jointer (nearly essential for the hardwood edges)
Thickness planer (nearly essential for the hardwood edges)
Power miter saw (not essential, but convenient)
Random orbit sander

As indicated above, I wouldn't really suggest trying to make speaker cabinets without a table saw and router. You could, as Robert suggested, get the lumber yard to cut the panels. Here in the US, most places seem to be happy to make one or two cuts to help you get an otherwise large piece into your car, but probably wouldn't be so happy about doing all of the cuts for a pair of speakers. The table saw is probably the most versatile power tool for woodworking and can be used in lots of ways.

For the construction method I used, the wood edges have to be very straight and square, and a jointer and thickness planer are the best way to mill them. But, you might well be able to find a small mill or cabinet shop that could mill some square-sectioned stock for you.

Probably the most challenging part of this construction was the three-way miter joints at the corner. I had never done this before, and I made two practice boxes out of cheap materials before I was convinced that I had a chance of making it work for the speakers. Mostly this requires very careful measurements and miter cuts. The power miter saw makes the cuts a bit easier, but it could certainly be done with a carefully set up table saw.

One thing that I might do differently the next time I try this kind of construction is to use "biscuits" to join the hardwood and panel pieces, rather than the tongue-and-groove joint. I'm not sure if biscuit is the word used in Britain (it's not the thing in the round package from McVittie's), but these are small flat pieces of wood that fit into a groove cut with a special tool, sometimes called a plate joiner. (I told you I was a tool junkie.)

A final note: In the course of making my speakers, I made a set of templates to guide my router when cutting out the interior baffle pieces. These are used with a small metal guide that fits around the router bit. I would be willing to send these to anyone building their own cabinets. The conditions are that the recipient has to pay the shipping and agrees to send them on to the next person who wants to use them. I live in Salt Lake City, UT, so this offer might only be of interest to other Yanks. Has anyone else in the US built a pair?

David
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  #13  
Old 16th September 2007, 09:32 AM
Brian Brian is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2006
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Posts: 323
Default Re: WD25Ts completed

David

You've done a great job there and your level of skill is very high, much too high for me to attempt to emulate what you've done, for example. I think your cabinets look quite superb.

By the way, "biscuit" is the word. Interesting that suppliers don't appreciate cutting panels to a number of smaller pieces in the US. This is a place where in my experience, the needs of a customer are never too much trouble compared to what I find here in the UK.

Brian

[quote=davidg;46421]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sid and Coke View Post
David;
Great job there David. A few questions if you don't mind .

i) Your speakers look great, What sort of 'woodworking' background do you have.

David and All;

ii) What tools would you recommend having to hand in addition to the ones that would be required to build a flat-Pack kit anyway.

I have been a weekend woodworker for about 12 years. I seem to manage one substantial project each year - this year it was the speakers. I would rank my skill level as intermediate, relative to someone who does fine cabinetry for a living.

I have to confess that I have a major weakness for tools. So, for this project, I used:

Table saw (essential)
Router, with a table for some operations (essential)
Planer/jointer (nearly essential for the hardwood edges)
Thickness planer (nearly essential for the hardwood edges)
Power miter saw (not essential, but convenient)
Random orbit sander

As indicated above, I wouldn't really suggest trying to make speaker cabinets without a table saw and router. You could, as Robert suggested, get the lumber yard to cut the panels. Here in the US, most places seem to be happy to make one or two cuts to help you get an otherwise large piece into your car, but probably wouldn't be so happy about doing all of the cuts for a pair of speakers. The table saw is probably the most versatile power tool for woodworking and can be used in lots of ways.

For the construction method I used, the wood edges have to be very straight and square, and a jointer and thickness planer are the best way to mill them. But, you might well be able to find a small mill or cabinet shop that could mill some square-sectioned stock for you.

Probably the most challenging part of this construction was the three-way miter joints at the corner. I had never done this before, and I made two practice boxes out of cheap materials before I was convinced that I had a chance of making it work for the speakers. Mostly this requires very careful measurements and miter cuts. The power miter saw makes the cuts a bit easier, but it could certainly be done with a carefully set up table saw.

One thing that I might do differently the next time I try this kind of construction is to use "biscuits" to join the hardwood and panel pieces, rather than the tongue-and-groove joint. I'm not sure if biscuit is the word used in Britain (it's not the thing in the round package from McVittie's), but these are small flat pieces of wood that fit into a groove cut with a special tool, sometimes called a plate joiner. (I told you I was a tool junkie.)

A final note: In the course of making my speakers, I made a set of templates to guide my router when cutting out the interior baffle pieces. These are used with a small metal guide that fits around the router bit. I would be willing to send these to anyone building their own cabinets. The conditions are that the recipient has to pay the shipping and agrees to send them on to the next person who wants to use them. I live in Salt Lake City, UT, so this offer might only be of interest to other Yanks. Has anyone else in the US built a pair?

David
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