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  #31  
Old 28th August 2019, 12:31 PM
Black Stuart Black Stuart is offline
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Default Re: Punchy bass

Peter, another excellent post full of useful information.What a shame that the original WAD site didn't include information on all aspects of audio systems, it would have saved me and others a lot of money and time. Of course it was one company orientated which accounts for this.

I was lucky to buy Heybrook Sextets Mk 1Vs for a very good price s/hand from a man unfortunate to have a miserable dragon for a wife, I would have got rid of her rather than the Sextets.

The Tonigen tweeter shows just how wonderful treble should be and I've always been amazed at how punchy the small woofer is. My one beef with the Sextets is the mids. I find the mids to be slightly recessed and slightly 'vague'.

I fully expect to resolve this issue by changing the caps for mainly K73-16 and Richey non polar and Mills power resistors.

Chris/VantheMan has already modded his speakers using K73-16 caps with, for me the expected natural clarity and detail these caps are noted for.

The Sextets are always well liked for their visual presentation when for me it's always the audio that is far more important - esta la vida
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  #32  
Old 28th August 2019, 11:14 PM
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Greg. Greg. is offline
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Default Re: Punchy bass

Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Stuart View Post
Peter, another excellent post full of useful information.What a shame that the original WAD site didn't include information on all aspects of audio systems, it would have saved me and others a lot of money and time. Of course it was one company orientated which accounts for this.

I was lucky to buy Heybrook Sextets Mk 1Vs for a very good price s/hand from a man unfortunate to have a miserable dragon for a wife, I would have got rid of her rather than the Sextets.

The Tonigen tweeter shows just how wonderful treble should be and I've always been amazed at how punchy the small woofer is. My one beef with the Sextets is the mids. I find the mids to be slightly recessed and slightly 'vague'.

I fully expect to resolve this issue by changing the caps for mainly K73-16 and Richey non polar and Mills power resistors.

Chris/VantheMan has already modded his speakers using K73-16 caps with, for me the expected natural clarity and detail these caps are noted for.

The Sextets are always well liked for their visual presentation when for me it's always the audio that is far more important - esta la vida
Glad you remain happy with your Sextet’s.

Just a note. Esta la vida does not actually mean a lot. Esta es la vida is more comprehensible albeit, I’m not sure it is relevant at the end of a post on a hi-fi forum.
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  #33  
Old 29th August 2019, 11:20 AM
Black Stuart Black Stuart is offline
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Default Re: Punchy bass

Greg,
VantheMan has alerted me to the correct castillano but in my 9 years living in Spain I never heard anyone (Spanish) use the correct castillano. I learned to speak Spanish 'as it's spoken by ordinary gallegos and the Semitic peoples of Andaluz.

Do you mean on an audio forum or an 'English' forum. As I have lived in a few different countries I have picked up expressions that appeal to me from different languages eg. sheiss gebert - in English it doesn't have the same intensity or effect.

I've also encountered lots of English, not Scots or Irish who have 'lived' in the Netherlands, Spain,France, Germany for years and years and through stupidity and or complete refusal never learned to speak a single word of the host country language. I have never encountered this attitude in any other people - go figure (an Americanism)
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  #34  
Old 30th August 2019, 11:48 AM
VantheMan VantheMan is offline
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Default Re: Punchy bass

Hi Greg, I think Stuart meant to say "Asi es la Vida" (Such is life or That´s life). I have lived in Spain for forty odd years and although my experience doesn´t mirror his findings at all, there again I have never lived in rural Andalucia or Galicia for that matter, I can more or less know where someone comes from by his accent or unique vocab. but not by his grammar, certainly the accents of Andaluz, Gallego, Catalan or Canarian, The Argentinian/Uruguayan accent are dead giveaways too as are the Caribbean countries like Venezuela, the Dominican or Cuban
Unlike Stuart I would certainly say that there is a general Spanish with a universal grammar held under very tight rein by the Real Academia de la Lengua and that some used to call Castillian to distinguish it from the Spanish spoken in South America who mostly pronounce the letters C,Z or S as one and the same whereas a mainland Spaniard would , as Stuart puts it, speak with a lisp when pronouncing the C and the Z as in the Spanish word for Beer written cerveza but pronounced Thervetha anywhere north of Andalucia but SERVESA anywhere south. Anyway, young people just say "birra", very similar sounding to beer or better still "Una caña" which is like ordering "bevvy" in the shape of a long glass of lager and they seem to parch their thirst quite well.
I must say I have never heard nor read of the story of the King´s lisp before - I reckon it was a Monty Python piss take from the Life of Brian - and it doesn´t stand up because of the existence of the letter S. Sorry to be boring but the difference between the letters C and Z in Spanish are essentially derived from the vowels that follow those letters - if the lisp sound is followed by an e or an i then it is written with a C, if followed by an a, o or u then it must be written with a Z because otherwise the C would sound like a K.
Think about Zaragoza (pronounced Tharagotha) and Cadiz (pronounced Kadis) but brezo (bretho) - heather and eco (echo).

God this sounds like Wikipedia. I´ll get my coat.
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  #35  
Old 30th August 2019, 11:49 AM
VantheMan VantheMan is offline
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Default Re: Punchy bass

Hi Greg, I think Stuart meant to say "Asi es la Vida" (Such is life or That´s life). I have lived in Spain for forty odd years and although my experience doesn´t mirror Stuart´s findings at all, there again I have never lived in rural Andalucia or Galicia for that matter, I can more or less know where someone comes from by his accent or unique vocab. but not by his grammar, certainly the accents of Andaluz, Gallego, Catalan or Canarian, The Argentinian/Uruguayan accent are dead giveaways too as are the Caribbean countries like Venezuela, the Dominican or Cuba
Unlike Stuart I would certainly say that there is a general Spanish with a universal grammar held under very tight rein by the Real Academia de la Lengua and that some used to call Castillian to distinguish it from the Spanish spoken in South America who mostly pronounce the letters C,Z or S as one and the same whereas a mainland Spaniard would , as Stuart puts it, speak with a lisp when pronouncing the C and the Z as in the Spanish word for Beer written cerveza but pronounced Thervetha anywhere north of Andalucia but SERVESA anywhere south. Anyway, young people just say "birra", very similar sounding to beer or better still "Una caña" which is like ordering "bevvy" in the shape of a long glass of lager and they seem to quench their thirst quite well.
I must say I have never heard nor read of the story of the King´s lisp before - I reckon it was a Monty Python piss take from the Life of Brian - and it doesn´t stand up because of the existence of the letter S. Sorry to be boring but the difference between the letters C and Z in Spanish are essentially derived from the vowels that follow those letters - if the lisp sound is followed by an e or an i then it is written with a C, if followed by an a, o or u then it must be written with a Z because otherwise the C would sound like a K.
Think about Zaragoza (pronounced Tharagotha) and Cadiz (pronounced Kadith) or brezo (bretho) - heather and eco (echo).

God this sounds like Wikipedia. I´ll get my coat. Viva el Punchy Bass

Last edited by VantheMan; 30th August 2019 at 07:07 PM.
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  #36  
Old 30th August 2019, 07:54 PM
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Default Re: Punchy bass

‘Asi es la Vida’ makes much more sense to me and it then becomes appropriate for a hi-fi forum, English or otherwise.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading your explanation. Please leave your coat on its peg.

In the same context, I suspect Stuart’s ‘sheiss gebert’ is meant to read ‘scheiss gebert’. I would suggest it’s meaning is so variable it is well dissolved compared to specific English expletives.
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  #37  
Old 31st August 2019, 11:26 AM
Black Stuart Black Stuart is offline
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Default Re: Punchy bass

Greg,
I didn't realise you were fluent in Spanish or did you just google to criticise my Spanish if so it represents monumental hypocrisy.
As to 'relevance' on an audio form - I have never seen you criticise threads on motor cycles which have cropped up frequently on this forum - why is this. You used to be into m/bikes at one time, if so this is plain personal bias.

Chris - Philipe el segundo was born with a lisp and as I said in the PM in Central and South America the conquistadores arrived there long before his birth. having spoken with people from Central and South America they find the lisping version of Spanish hilarioius and stupid. This lisping monarch has been dead a long time, time to drop this irrational way of speaking the language. An example you could have given was - city - ciudad, totally stupid spoken with a lisp.

Most Spanish, men and women speak with an awful nasal whining voice, it's not a language that I like unlike French especially spoken by the women, great inflection and musical.

Spanish was created from two completely different languages - Latin and Arabic.The White Aryan invaders - Goths/Visigoths/Vandals and Swabians had very basic vocabularies to put it mildly, totally inferior to Arabic, that's why Spain retains mostly Arabic names of it's cities and about 70% of Spanish names are Jewish Semitic, ironic when the Aryan Christians persecuted the Safardic Jews.



In the first century AD the Romans hired a Greek geographer to map the Mediterranean coast of the land they conquered and this geographer stated that a squirrel could travel from Gibralter to the Pyrenees without having to set foot on the ground. It wasn't the Semites who cut down the forests it was Christians who destroyed that great civilisation of Al-Andaluz.
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  #38  
Old 31st August 2019, 09:36 PM
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Greg. Greg. is offline
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Default Re: Punchy bass

Stuart, I do not speak Spanish. In fact my only language is English and I have much admiration for people who are bi or multi-lingual, yourself included.

When anyone uses a foreign (to me) phrase in a post made principally in English, I take the trouble to look up a translation and indeed, I use google.

When I searched ‘esta la vida’, google threw up a blank, but the nearest they had was ‘Esta es la vida’, ‘this is the life’. I could not see how this phrase when translated was relevant in the context of the thread subject or your reply.

Chris(I think) VantheMan has provided an explanation which is much more relevant and comprehensible, and I think what you originally meant for interpretation. As much as I admire your skill in speaking the language colloquially, when writing down what you want to say, particularly on a forum in a different language, being grammatically and word structure correct is important. Well it is to me, but then I’m probably a grumpy old pedant.

Similarly you used ‘sheiss gebert’. Again google drew a blank but ‘scheiss gebert’ did make sense although I disagree with your view that it has more effect than the English options as it is a watered down phrase covered by a number of meanings. There are a variety of English phrases that can be used to translate this and they all are far more specific.

No hypocrisy involved here. Just a desire for accuracy so your readers exactly understand what you intend to convey in your writing. Asi es la vida, don’t you think?
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  #39  
Old 31st August 2019, 10:38 PM
VantheMan VantheMan is offline
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Me again,
Just to say that each to his own and that it is probably just as well that Stuart now lives in a country with whose language he feels comfortable. I can’t help thinking that he would have run into serious opposition had he expressed in public his opinion of how Spanish sounds. If anyone is at all interested in the reasoning behind the c,z and s “ question, they should look up the words “seseo” and “ceceo” in Spanish and also a bit on history regarding the geographical origins of the majority of the Spanish settlers in the Americas, eminently Andaluces, Extremeños and Canarios who, of course, never suffer from “lisps” unless they they have spent a lot of time in Malaga, Cadiz or Sevilla where Andalusian people are known to pronounce the “th” sound when it’s written with an s, just to complicate things.
And what about the double LL in Welsh ? Does that sound ridiculous to anyone ?
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  #40  
Old 31st August 2019, 10:58 PM
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Greg. Greg. is offline
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Originally Posted by VantheMan View Post
And what about the double LL in Welsh ? Does that sound ridiculous to anyone ?
Ha, that’s a good one. Not sure we’ve yet had any Welsh speaking members here wanting to include any of their native phraseology although we do indeed enjoy their membership and contribution. This thing has probably become simply a pretty unimportant distraction and we should all wrap it up.
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